Fidgets: Quiet Ways for Fidgety Kids to Release Energy

 

Fidgets have become increasingly popular both at home and at school.  Used properly, they can be a great tool.

Some kids are in constant motion.  They are moving, tapping, bouncing, touching, or talking.  Often when these are occurring in a group or a classroom, it becomes a disruption to learning around them.  This is when parents and educators need to come up with a creative toolbox of quiet fidgets for children to use to burn that energy.

Fidgets are all the rage right now.  They are all over the news, as well as schools.  As a result fidgets are also getting a bad rap and are being banned.  But there are many more types of fidgets, beyond the fidget spinner that is in every store.

What is the Problem?

Certain children, such as those with autism or ADHD, may be in constant motion.  Asking them to sit quietly in a seat is impossible.  They are kicking, squirming in their seat, ripping paper, or walking around the room.  They may talk a lot while sitting or make other noises.

Why Does This Occur?

It is thought that impaired motor control centers in the brain are the cause of fidgety, hyperactive behavior.  Impulse-control problems also play a part.  The hyperactive child is unable to inhibit the impulse to move around.

How to Help

Parents and educators need to provide physical outlets that let these children  release pent-up energy and improve focus.

Types of Fidgets

fidget spinner

Fidgets are really anything that can be quietly squished or handled. Not having to focus on staying absolutely still conserves the child’s energy for focusing on class lessons or other activities.  First year special education teachers, it’s definitely worth collecting some of these for your classroom.  Here, are my recommended soothing, effective fidgets for children who focus best when they are chewing, squeezing, picking, or  spinning.

Wikki Stix

wikki stix fidget

Wikki Stix are a combination of wax and yarn that your child can bend, twist, roll and sculpt to create art.  They are durable, cannot be pulled apart, and can be cut.  They help with fine motor skills and sensory stimulation, and are great to strengthen little fingers.

Silly Putty

silly putty fidget

Silly Putty is a tried and true inexpensive favorite fidget.  It can be squished, pulled and squashed which provides lots of handheld stimulation.  There are different brands such as TheraPutty and Power Putty which have different resistance levels depending on the child’s hand strength.

Dog Tag Chewies

Dog Tag Chewies fidget

If your child is always chewing things such as nails, hair, or objects than these dog tags provide a more sanitary and appropriate alternative.  They are a discreet alternative that provide oral stimulation and tactile.  The chewies are made of silicone that is free of BPA and can be put in the dishwasher for cleaning.

Palm Weight

palm weight fidget

The soft beanbag-like pillow with a hook-and-loop strap fits in the palm of your hand, or on the back of your hand, and is then secured by a strap. The weight steadies and calms hands. It provides proprioceptive input and sensory feedback to help encourage proper writing position and better handwriting. The weight calms fidgety hands so children and adults can concentrate on writing. The weight has just the right input to help improve handwriting and boost writing skills.,

Cheww Stixx

chewie stixx fidget

Children who chew pencils and erasers often don’t realize they are doing it, it can be a dangerous habit.   Cheww Stixx are oral fidgets that fit on the end of a pencil and satisfy the need to chew.  they come in lots of colors and designs, are free of BPA, and can be washed in the dishwasher.

Fiddle Linx

FiddleLinks Fidget

This was designed by a hand therapist and has interlocking and rotating pieces to provide light stimulation and strengthen fingers.  It allows the children to keep their eye on the teacher, and is a good choice for the older student.

Ziggy Pasta

ziggy pasta fidget

Ziggy Pasta is tons of colorful noodles that slide through your fingers as you squeeze.  It provides a soothing sensation for a child that is highly sensitive to different textures.  It does not make any noise and is a favorite choice of teachers.

Denim Pocket Lap Pad

denim lap pad fidget

Weighted blankets are great choices for schildren with sensory processing disorder and ADHD but not a great choice in the classroom. This smaller version allows the child to keep it on their lap at their desk and also slide their hands in the pockets.  It provides calming pressure and helps remind the child stay in their seat when restless.  It is a bit expensive but is durable and will last a long time.

Boinks

boinks fidget

Boinks are a small tube of nylon with a marble sealed inside.  You can squeeze or slide the marble back and forth, bend it, fold it, squeeze the sleeve together and roll the marble like shaking a bell. 

OVER TO YOU

Does your child fidget?  Have you or a teacher tried any of these fidgets?  Let me know your thoughts in the comments below.  I’d love to hear from you!

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5 Toys to teach Alphabet Letters and Sounds (Phonemic Awareness)

 

letters sounds phonemic awareness alphabet

The new preschool year has just started.  Some of you may be thinking, how can I help my child learn to read at home?  What are the most important skills they will need for kindergarten?  They need to know their letters and the sounds.  This is so important and the basis for taking the next step when learning to read.  There are so many toys on the market, but how do you know if they are good?

I have rounded up some of my favorite toys to help teach letters and their sounds, also known as phonemic awareness in teacher talk.  These toys are a great way to practice and have fun while doing so.

5 Toys to Teach Letters and Sounds

letters sounds phonemic awareness alphabet

Fridge phonics magnet letter set.  This toy was around 12 years ago when my oldest was toddling around, and is still one of the best.  It has nice big letters, easy for little hands to grasp.  Press the letter and they can hear the sound and how it’s used in a word.

 

letters sounds phonemic awareness alphabet

Learn the Alphabet Dough Mats.  Kids use dough to form each letter right on the mats.  This helps to boost letter recognition & fine motor skills as they create!  The set comes with 26 mats.

letters sounds phonemic awareness alphabet

Alpha Catch Phonics Game.  This is a great game to involve some physical activity.  You take turns tossing the ball and say the letter or sound, or both!  The same idea can be used for sight words.

letters sounds phonemic awareness alphabet

Uppercase Alphabet and Number Dough Stampers.  Kids love playdough.  This activity reinforces their letters and numbers, while having them practice fine motor skills.  Ask them to find a particular letter, make the sound, make a pattern with two letters, the options are endless.

letters sounds phonemic awareness alphabet

Alphabet Marks the Spot.  The kid alphabet version of Twister! Call a letter or sound, kids run to the spot.  Watch them get all twisted up!  You would start with letter names, progress to sounds, and then a word that starts with the sound.

This should help on the road to preparing for school.  Check out my link on how to encourage reading with your little ones!

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5 Tips to Encourage Reading

 

5 tips to encourage readers

 

I am a reading specialist and special educator by profession.  I have spent many years working with small groups of children, trying to encourage them as readers.  Most of these children are 2 or more years behind with their reading.  As a reading specialist and special educator I have received a TON of training on how to teach reading, how readers learn, and the science of reading.  The fact remains that the best way to learn to read, is to develop a love of reading.  Today I am going to offer 5 tips to help encourage a love of reading at any age.

5 tips to encourage readers

  1.  Introduce new and engaging books.  Libraries have plenty of choices.  But have you thought to look at garage sales, consignment sales, or trading with friends?  Try and make a weekly trip to your local library to constantly have a rotating collection of stories.
  2. Create special experiences that involve reading.  My children look forward to Daddy reading time each evening, where they cuddle up in bed and listen to him read a chapter book.  My toddler loves when we lay out a quilt and pull up a bin of books to read and look through.
  3. Children should be encouraged to self select books.  Yes, even your toddlers.  Keep the books at their eye level, where they can pull books out and decide what they want to look through.  Reading should be done both independently and supported.  Toddlers learn about concepts such as turning pages, direction of print, by looking through books.  It is important to allow toddlers to explore books and develop an interest in reading.
  4. Children should hear and see a variety of people reading.  This includes different members of your immediate household.  It also includes other family and friends you may be visiting or trips to the local story time at the library.  Children should understand that reading is important to everyone around them.
  5. Create a special reading nook.  It doesn’t have to be fancy, but don’t you love a place to cozy up to a story?  Maybe you have a few special blankets to cuddle when reading, or a special little chair next to a basket of favorite books.  Make it inviting and comfortable.  Check out some of my pins for creative reading areas 

5 tips to encourage readers

How have you encouraged reading in your home?

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IEP Meeting: 10 Questions Every Parent Should Ask

iep meeting

Preparing to attend an IEP Meeting? These are 10 questions every parent should ask the team in an IEP meeting!

I want this post to provide support for families and be able to express myself clearly.  I have served as a special education teacher for many years in the school system.  I have sat in on hundreds of IEPs and intervention meetings. They are a regular part of my work week.  And they don’t have to be scary or intimidating!

Why would I say that?  Well it provides a chance for families and all staff that works with that child to communicate and brainstorm.  It is a chance to create a plan to help children who need support.  It provides a chance to create a truly individualized plan to meet the students’ needs.

An IEP meeting is a chance for school personnel and parents to communicate.  The one thing I say to every parent before an IEP meeting is to be prepared.  Make sure you have done your homework.  An IEP meeting can be an amazingly positive experience if everyone is able to communicate clearly.

IEP meeting

A FEW THINGS TO DO BEFORE AN IEP MEETING:

-observe in your child’s current classroom setting if allowed

-reread their expiring IEP if they already have one…..do you feel their academic and behavioral goals have been met? Be prepared to share YOUR thoughts.

-make a list of concerns and a list of accomplishments.  What is going WELL? What is still a struggle?

-research the academic standards for your child’s grade level…….consider where they currently fall in terms of those standards.  They may need support still, and that’s TOTALLY fine.  But the more you’ve thought about these long term goals….the more prepared you’ll be to speak to them and to listen to the team.

-be prepared to ask questions (a lot of them)

iep meeting

IEP Meetings: 10 Questions Every Parent Should Ask

  1. How can I contact you? Ask each member of the IEP Meeting Team the BEST way to contact them.  Let them know you’ll be checking in regularly.
  2. When is a good time to have an informal conversation about my child’s progress? Teachers are more than willing to chat and meet about your child.  However their day is often very busy, so it is best to ask them what time would work the best.
  3. What do you see as my child’s strengths? How can I support and encourage them? An IEP meeting should not be all about weaknesses.  Ask how you can support your child’s strengths and passions.  These strengths and passions are what will make your kiddo successful as an adult.
  4. What type of progress can I expect to see? What will this look like? The great thing about an IEP meeting is that you get the input of specialists.  But that’s also the toughest at times.  Acronyms, teacher speak, developmental milestones….it can be VERY overwhelming.  After each IEP section, ask the team…….what should this LOOK like? How long will it be before I see progress? What are the signs that we are moving in the right directions? What should I watch out for?
  5. What can I do at home to support our goals? For students to make the most progress (emotionally or academically), goals needs to be fluid between school and home.  Ask the team…..what can I do at home? Ask for specific suggestions.
  6. Which of these goals are the top priority? Between behavioral goals and academic goals…..by the end of an IEP meeting, you’ll feel like your head is spinning.  An important thing to ask…..which of these is top priority? Is it behavioral (transitioning to school, for instance)? Is it academic (phonemic awareness….you need to read before you can write or comprehend text)?  Ask the team.  That way, you’ll know what to focus on in discussions about school.
  7. How will we measure progress? How will we communicate about this with my child? Progress towards goals (both academic and behavioral) can be measured in many ways.  Will the team be using test scores? A running record with observations of the child? A tally system of behaviors being exhibited (or not exhibited)?
  8. What do these supports look like on a daily basis? How will my child’s day look? Academic and behavior supports can be provided in MANY ways.  Will the supports be a pull-out model (student removed from the class for small group support) or a push-in model (the support staff blends in to the classroom for a period of time)?   You should know EXACTLY what your child’s day looks like!
  9. Who will provide these supports? How will my child’s classroom teacher be provided with resources and assistance to implement these supports? The best thing about having a support team in place? Everyone helps EACH OTHER (that includes you mom and dad)! Ask questions.  How can you support the teacher? How can the speech therapist support you?
  10. What would YOU do if this were YOUR child? An IEP meeting can often be all business.  In the end….what would I want to know? If this were your own family member, what would you suggest?  Trust me, you’ll get some pretty honest answers.

iep meeting

IEP meeting questions Poster (1)

Are you looking for more information about IEP’s and 504 Plans?

Here are some fantastic resources

What is the difference between and IEP and 504 Plan?

Why you might need a 504 Plan

10 Common Mistakes Parents Make at IEP meetings

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